Sessions/Clinicians: Descriptions and Schedule

 
  




  

 


   




 






 


Links to available handouts are listed after session descriptions:

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9
INTEREST SESSION I, 11:00 am–12:15 pm

Click on names for links to short bios. 

1. Imagine What Lies Beneath: Mining for Jewels in the Choral Ensemble 
Brad Holmes, clinician
This session will discuss methods used to help students dig beneath the surface of the pitches and rhythms as they search for aesthetic jewels initially unseen. Methods of encouraging imagination in the rehearsal will be introduced and the imagination/ technique cycle will be discussed.

2. Teaching Historical and Cultural Context through Choral Music
Paul Caldwell 
and Sean Ivoryclinicians
Much of the world's music finds its power through relationships with events, cultures, and the great stories of civilization. This session will focus on ways to identify with and remember those things we should never forget.


3. The Wonder Years
 
Randy Swiggum and Margaret Jenksclinicians
Wondering what to do with middle school boys? Want to explore the wonder of amazing historical literature for young singers? Wondering what's so wonderful about the changing voice? Come witness this "informance," featuring singers from the Madison Youth Choir's Holst Boychoir, that will focus on music selection, voice change, encouraging boys to keep singing, and strategies for a comprehensive rehearsal.

4. Building an Ensemble 
Members of Clerestoryclinicians
Living up to its architectural name, Clerestory has built its unconducted, undirected musical democracy from the ground up. The ensemble will share its techniques and practices for programming, rehearsing without a leader, verbal and musical communication, listening from within, and building group knowledge and memory. Clerestory encourages singers to take their eyes off the score and even the conductor, liberating music from the page.


5. Introduction to Bel Canto Solfeggio
John Armstrong 
and Kristin Zaryskiclinicians 
More than music literacy, this is an overview of a three-step sequence (in the air, on the board, from the page) that helps singers to visualize, feel and hear beautiful tone while singing together in an ensemble setting. John and Kristin will show non-verbal ways to obtain bel canto tone and accurate intonation with singers of all ages as they move within the pulse. Does the singer serve the choir and does the choir serve the singer? Why settle for half a singer?

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9
READING SESSION I with Lesson Plans, 3:15–4:05 pm

Elementary: Diane Skrobis (WI) and Barbara Sletto (IA)


Middle Level: Kathy Gedler 
(IA) and Marcia Russell (WI)


Advanced High School/College: Rebecca Winnie
 (WI) and Phillip Swan (WI)

 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9
INTEREST SESSION II, 4:15–5:30 pm

6. The Bridge to Somewhere: Using Performance Repertoire as a Vehicle to Develop Music Reading Skills
Angela Broekerclinician
Though many of us spend time teaching sight-singing at the beginning of each choral rehearsal, students are not always able to see how the skills they build during this time impact the learning and performance of choral repertoire. In this session, choral pieces will be used to construct music reading exercises and activities that apply directly to learning the performance repertoire. Elementary age choirs will be the focus of this presentation.

7. Building Literacy and Musicianship Skills into the Choral Rehearsal: TAKADIMI and Beyond 
Carol Kruegerclinician
Far too often singers are musically illiterate when they enter the choral setting and directors aren't sure how to develop elementary skills in younger and older singers. Working from the premise that singers learn musical skills in much the same order as they do language skills, participants will explore how we learn music through hearing and imitating patterns before reading and writing. The TAKADIMI rhythm-pedagogy system will be addressed as well as specific techniques for developing rhythm reading readiness, literacy, audition, musical memory, dictation, and elementary composition.


8. From Start to Finish: 
Developing Artistry
Wes Hansmeyer and Annette Mitchell, clinicians
Wes and Annette, members of the music faculty in the Norris, NE school district, will demonstrate, with video clips of elementary, middle and high school students, a practical daily process for developing student growth in independence and artistry.

9. A Community That Sings: New Arrangements of America's Classics, Songbook Volume II 
Kevin Meidl, clinician
The North Central Division's continuing efforts to provide its members with quality arrangements of American folksongs have produced twelve new pieces by some of our country's best-known composers. Kevin Meidl, former NC-ACDA president and originator of this project, will lead this reading session. Pieces premiered at this session are available for NC-ACDA members' use, at no charge.

10. Process in Practice: Honor Choir Observations
Because Beyond the Notes is all about the process of music-making, open rehearsals of the four honor choirs will provide a unique inside view of the process of music-making as conductors/teachers engage singers' imaginations, developing artistry in ways that connect mind, body, and spirit. While honor choir singers have prepared most selections before their arrival in Madison, each honor choir will also learn one piece entirely from scratch, providing an organic perspective of the process of learning a piece from start to finish. Additionally, Paul Caldwell and Sean Ivory will take this process orientation a step further as they guide middle level women in creating and performing their own composition.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10
INTEREST SESSION III, 8:45–10:00 am

11. Genesis and Structure of To Be Certain of the Dawn 
Stephen Paulus, Michael Dennis Browne, Michael O'Connell, clinicians
To Be Certain of the Dawn, a Holocaust memorial oratorio written by Stephen Paulus, with libretto by Michael Dennis Browne, was written as a result of interfaith dialogue and with the purpose of encouraging ongoing conversation between people of faith. Paulus, Browne, and Father Michael O'Connell, who commissioned the work, will talk about the ideas and goals that spawned the commission, the collaborative writing process of uniting text and music in this highly dramatic work, and the poetic and musical structure that leads to its emotional and intellectual impact on listeners and performers.

12. Integrating the Art with the Science
John Armstrong 
and Kristin Zaryskiclinicians
John and Kristin will show how to integrate the "Bel Canto Solfeggio" concept throughout the choral rehearsal, developing tone, intonation, rhythm and meter elements while singing freely and expressively. Learn how to transition from singing bel canto warm-ups and fundamental handsign/solfeggio skills to sight-reading and learning new literature. You don't have to sacrifice the art to gain the science of singing beautifully and independently.   


13. BodySinging: 
Moving Singers Toward More Expressive Choral Performance
Therees Hibbard, clinician
This session will focus on the musical, emotional, and expressive development of choral singers through the integration of the vocal/physical connection in rehearsal and performance. The session will include demonstration and discussion of how building "body-voices" allows singers to feel, express, and understand the deep meaning in the music they are singing. Through the gentle progression of a "BodySinging" class specifically designed with choral singers in mind, the singers will experience how the engagement of the whole body when singing can have a profound effect on tone, phrasing, rhythmic integrity, musicality, and can create a holistic artistic approach to choral performance.

14. Behind the Scenes with the Czech Boys Choir
Jakub Martinec,
 clinician
The conductor of the Czech Boys Choir will provide an in-depth picture of the ensembles. He will address such topics as recruitment, vocal development of technique for unchanged and changing voices and boychoir performances practices. He will also introduce Central European choral music by contemporary composers, suitable for boys choirs.

15. New Choral Frontiers: Cuba, ACDA, and the International Conductor Exchange Program
David Puderbaugh, clinician
ACDA's International Conductors Exchange Program represents an opportunity for a new generation of choral specialists to affirm that choral music-making transcends national borders, ideologies, religions, and all those demarcations that too often divide us. This session, featuring Alina Orraca, an ICEP participant from Cuba, provides a rare opportunity to look inside the choral culture of Cuba.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10
INTEREST SESSION IV, 1:15–2:30 pm

16. The Music of Stephen Paulus
Stephen Paulusclinician
Composer Stephen Paulus, whose oratorio To Be Certain of the Dawn will be performed during the conference, will lead a reading session of his music and discuss his compositional process, the way he marries text to music, and how he thinks about musical structure in writing choral music.

17. Building Literacy and Musicianship Skills into the Choral Rehearsal: Tonal
Carol Kruegerclinician
In this session the sound-to-symbol learning sequence will be applied to tonal reading. To aid the development of aural-oral tonal skills, a sequence of vocal pitch exercises will be presented in a graphic form that can be utilized via overhead transparencies or an LCD projector. Teaching strategies and activities for developing tonal audiation, musical memory, dictation and aural skills will also be addressed.


18. Process to Product: 
Demystifying Score Study and Energizing Your Rehearsals
David Raylclinician
For many choral specialists, the term "score study" conjures up a certain negative image: hours (that none of us have) of analytical drudgery sitting at a piano trying to decipher the "composer's intent." Using several works from standard high school repertoire, this session demonstrates ways to bring score study down from the ivory tower to a practical way of determining rehearsal goals and strategies. Learner outcomes include an increased understanding of how score study relates to interpretive decisions, reduced anxiety about what score study entails, and increased confidence in one's ability to wed analytical skills with creative imagination.

19. When Music Meets Theologies
Kyle Lechtenberg, clinician
This interactive panel discussion with regional interfaith leaders and choral music professionals will address opportunities and challenges that arise in the performance of sacred music. Questions addressed will include: 1) What considerations should be involved in the performance of the music of a religious tradition unfamiliar to the director or to the ensemble? 2) In what kinds of situations should an interfaith worship service be developed, and who should be invited? 3) What creative, inspirational, and unifying non-worship experiences can achieve similar goals as a worship service? This session is geared towards helping you to develop interfaith experiences which build harmony, goingbeyond the notes, and into the hearts of those you serve.

20. Igniting Imagination in Rehearsal
Patricia Cahalan Connors, clinician
The imagination is one of our most powerful tools in making music. It is the fire that propels us beyond the notes to meaningful, expressive singing. It can also be the key to actually accomplishing the notes in a free, effective, and satisfying way. This session will present specific rehearsal techniques that engage the imagination through imagery and movement. Strategies will address issues of rhythm and meter, phrase shaping, energy, and expression.

21. Process in Practice: Honor Choir Observations
Because Beyond the Notes is all about the process of music-making, open rehearsals of the four honor choirs will provide a unique inside view of the process of music-making as conductors/teachers engage singers' imaginations, developing artistry in ways that connect mind, body, and spirit. While honor choir singers have prepared most selections before their arrival in Madison, each honor choir will also learn one piece entirely from scratch, providing an organic perspective of the process of learning a piece from start to finish. Additionally, Paul Caldwell and Sean Ivory will take this process orientation a step further as they guide middle level women in creating and performing their own composition.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10
READING SESSION II with Lesson Plans, 4:30–5:20 pm

SAB/Accessible SATB: Cathy Britton (SD) and Natalie McDonald (IA)


Middle Level (repeat); Kathy Gedler 
(IA) and Marcia Russell (WI)


Music in Worship: John Albrecht
 (WI) and Greg Zielke (NE)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11
READING SESSION III with Lesson Plans, 10:30 am–11:20 am

SAB/Accessible SATB (repeat): Cathy Britton (SD) and Natalie McDonald (IA)


Elementary (repeat): Diane Skrobis
 (WI) and Barbara Sletto (IA)


Vocal Jazz:
Matthew & Shelly Armstrong (IA)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11
INTEREST SESSION V, 11:30 am–12:45 pm

22. Developing Musicianship in the Digital Age through the Use of the iPad and Other Technologies
Christopher J. Russell, clinician
The iPad has had a unique cultural impact and it has the potential to revolutionize the field of choral music. This session will demonstrate some of the ways the iPad can be used to go beyond the notes as a music reader, for score preparation, for sight-reading, for historical research, to find online resources, as an audio or video recorder, for assessment, for composition, and to help develop independent, imaginative choral musicians who are engaged and involved in the creative process. Many of the concepts discussed in the session could be transferable to other platforms.

23. Making Music Meaningful
Roger Henderson, clinician
Participants in this session will be guided through musical excerpts with specific outcomes and strategies that have the potential to intentionally create meaningful singing experiences beyond the notes—perhaps because of the notes. The session will also offer additional concrete strategies participants can transfer to their own situations and the music they're rehearsing with their own choirs.


24. Building Literacy and Musicianship Skills into the Choral Rehearsal: 
Melodic
Carol Kruegerclinician
This session will focus on melodic reading and the implementation of tonal, rhythmic and melodic reading to choral repertoire via curriculum maps that specifically outline the literacy process for each octavo.

25. Why Are You Here? Planning for What Really Matters 
Patricia Trump, clinician
Why did you become a choral director? Most likely it was because, at some point, the simple act of singing with other people transformed your life. Unfortunately, the pressures of "making it through the next performance" can cause even the best musicians to forget what drew them to music in the first place. This session will explore why you should consider the affective needs of your singers and reveal concrete ways you can plan for experiences that will transform your teaching and the lives of those you teach.


26. Get Out of Their Way: 
Enabling Singers to Be Independent Musicians
Paul Carey, clinician
In this session composer Paul Carey will work with a high school choir he has not met in advance as they are presented with a new piece of music. Instead of telling the students about the text and music and how they should rehearse it, Carey will guide them as they make their own discoveries, discuss possible musical decisions, and work as a full group and in teams.